The crown and lion english pub

Domestic Beers on Tap


BUDWEISER Lager

BUD LIGHT Light Beer


Premium Domestic Beers on Tap


ALEXANDER KEITH'S Pale Ale

ALEXANDER KEITH'S RED Amber Ale

MICHELOB ULTRA Light Beer

ROLLING ROCK Pale Lager

MILL STREET ORGANIC Lager

MILL STREET WEST COAST IPA - India Pale Ale

MILL STREET 100th MERIDIAN - Amber Lager

SHOCK TOP Wheat Ale

COBBLESTONE from MILL STREET Stout Ale

Imported Beers on Tap

BASS English Ale

BODDINGTONS Cream Ale

GUINNESS Stout

HARP Lager

KILKENNY Cream Ale

SMITHWICKS Dark Ale

STELLA ARTOIS Lager

HOP HOUSE 13 Lager



Cider on Tap


BRICKWORKS from Mill Street

On tap 20 of the Finest beers found in Canada


Just so you know what you're getting, here's an explanation of the different types of beers we offer.

 

Bitter is a broad term applied to a well-hopped pale ale, from about 3.5% to 7% in strength and pale gold to dark mahogany in color. 

 

Mild ale is generally considered to be a low-gravity beer with a low hop rate and predominantly malty palate and Light mild is generally similar, but pale in color.


Pale ale is a beer made by warm fermentation using predominantly pale malt. The higher proportion of pale malts results in a lighter colour. The term "pale ale" first appeared around 1703 for beers made from malts dried with coke, which resulted in a lighter colour than other beers popular at that time. Different brewing practices and hop levels have resulted in a range of taste and strength within the pale ale family


Cream ale is related to pale lager. They are generally brewed to be light and refreshing with a straw to pale golden color. Hop and malt flavor is usually subdued but like all beer styles it is open to individual interpretation, so some breweries give them a more assertive character.

 

Old ale is a term applied to dark, malty beers above 4.5% abv, also sometimes called Winter Warmers.


Wheat beer is a beer that is brewed with a large proportion of wheat in addition to malted barley. Wheat beers are usually top-fermented (as required by law in Germany). The main varieties are weissbier (includes hefeweizen), witbier, and the sour varieties, such as lambic, Berliner Weisse and gose.

 

Porters and stoutsare generally as dark or darker than old ales, and significantly more bitter. They differ from dark milds and old ales in the use of roast grains, which adds to the bitterness, and lends flavours of toast, biscuit, or coffee.

 

Lager is the term generally used for bottom-fermented beer.